This is the question in question: How does the theory of subspace work?

Normally, I'd expect this to be a Star Trek question, and have no issue with it. Then I saw that isn't a tag, and took a closer look:

I'm talking about in relations to the idea of "SubSpace" not to a particular Sci-Fi universe.

This looks like a problem to me.

  • Star Trek uses subspace as an alternate part of the time/space continuum, distinct from normal space. The warp drive manipulates it for FTL in that universe.
  • Stargate has subspace, but it's only used for communication and wormhole connections (as far as I recall). Their FTL involves hyperspace.
  • @TangoOversway added this in chat: It reminds me of the Lost in Space movie where Prof. Robinson says, "Subspace is a layer of space above regular space." Above? Not under? And how can you have an above and under anyway?

Then there's issues where, instead of subspace, we have the Slipstream (which is kind of like subspace, in that it's an alternate level of reality) and Starburst (which goes through an alternate dimension and could be considered subspace-like). Oh, and Babylon 5's "hyperspace" works much more like Star Trek's "subspace" (except ships can also traverse it) than it is like Stargate's "hyperspace".

(Sorry; /mini-rant)

So yeah; there's a lot of ambiguous overlap and disconnections between universes...

On the other hand.

This is an old question, it has lots of upvotes, hasn't been closed, and has an accepted answer. So there doesn't really seem to be much of a reason to close it from that side. The only reason to close it now, that I can think of, is that new users may see it and think this type of question is common - when in reality, it's still open largely due to the age of the question.

So... thoughts? Update the question to be more about Star Trek, close it, leave it?

share
    
WOW I fell totally favored by you guys. Your talking about one of my questions. Although I suppose I was here when beta began and tried to spark conversations. –  Justin Jan 16 '13 at 18:47
    
@Justin Feel free to take one of Gilles's suggestions and edit the question, closure is not permanent –  Izkata Jan 16 '13 at 19:56
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the question should be closed as not a real question. It's basically a list question in disguise; unless you talk about one specific universe you'll get the theory of subspace/hyperspace for every sf universe as an answer, and they'll all be right assuming the answers are properly sourced.

share
1  
Seems this, until/unless Justin responds –  Izkata Jan 7 '13 at 4:32
    
Yeah it was a terribly worded question, my bad. I wanted a general "Subspace" answer and why it's used across sci-fi literature, and I wondered about other sy-fy universes uses of subspace. But it was answered as just a generic term for a layer of a universe used for whatever the writter intends to use it for. –  Justin Jan 16 '13 at 18:48
add comment

The asker was adamant that the question was about “the idea of "SubSpace" not to a particular Sci-Fi universe”. Yet “subspace” is not a well-defined concept, it's just a word that several writers have used to mean different things. It isn't fundamentally different from “hyperspace” or other formulations. So we have a choice:

  • Make the question about Star Trek after all, matching the accepted answer, but not the asker's will.
  • Make the question generic, matching all three non-accepted answers, but going against the asker's will, and remaining with a question that begs to be unasked (which two of the answers do well).

I think the question can remain — but it needs to be clear that it's asking about Star Trek.

share
    
Your phrasing now also has me wondering if it was perhaps meant for Physics.SE, the asker being uncertain if subspace was a reallife concept or not.. –  Izkata Dec 29 '12 at 2:45
    
See my comment on the answer above. lol. –  Justin Jan 16 '13 at 18:50
add comment

The question should be generalized and hint at examples of SubSpace use.

I wanted a general "Subspace" answer and why it's used across sci-fi literature, and I wondered about other sy-fy universes uses of subspace. But it was answered as just a generic term for a layer of a universe used for whatever the writer intends to use it for.

The User that was marked as answered was the best answer at the time. Even if they did answer with a star trek link and such...

I hope this helps you guys! Hey we should consider mentioning the owner of the question when it is mentioned in a meta. It would help me help you.

share
add comment

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .